On-line First

J Plant Biotechnol

Published online January 24, 2024

© The Korean Society of Plant Biotechnology

Best practices for initiation of banana and plantain (Musa spp.) cultures

FATMA HUSSEIN KIRUWA 1*, EMMANUEL EPATHRA MLINGA 1, AGATHA AMNAAY ALOYCE , MPOKI MATHEW SHIMWELA

1TANZANIA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (TARI) Tengeru Sub Centre, 2TANZANIA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (TARI) Maruku Sub Centre, 3The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology (NM-AIST)

Received: 5 December 2023; Accepted: 24 January 2024

Abstract

Banana is a staple food and income crop for many people across the world. The study identified best practices for the initiation of banana (Musa spp.) cultures. Cultivars studied were East African Highland Bananas (Mchare, Nshakara), and Plantains, highly demanded by the farmers. The assessed factors included sterilization techniques for rainy and dry seasons, explants size, effects of Benzyl-Amino Purine (BAP) concentration on regeneration of cultures, effect of ascorbic acid on culture browning and culturing conditions. The finding revealed that ethanol alone (70%) or in combination with 1% sodium hypochlorite gives a higher (≥ 96%) percentage of aseptic culture establishment for both rainy and dry seasons. Size of explants was observed to affect the survival and regeneration of cultures as small (˂10mm) explants like meristem dome led to slower re-growth and high mortality which is not the case for large explants (≥ 10 mm). Moreover, MS media supplemented with BAP significantly enhanced the greening/shoot regeneration percentage at 14 days. However, there was no significant increase in number of greening/culture regeneration at concentrations of 5mg/l, 6mg/l and 8mg/l for Mzuzu, and 3mg/l, 5mg/l and 6mg/l for Nshakara. When explants were pre-treated with ascorbic acid at the rate of 100mg/l exposed for 10 min, browning decreased by 18%. It was also observed that growth conditions such as light were a greater determinant for regeneration of initiated banana cultures. Therefore, the study suggests the use of appropriate sterilization techniques, explants size, growth regulators, and conditions to insure sufficient production of planting materials.

Keywords Browning, East African Highland Banana, Tissue culture, Culture contamination, Sterilization

Article

On-line First

J Plant Biotechnol

Published online January 24, 2024

Copyright © The Korean Society of Plant Biotechnology.

Best practices for initiation of banana and plantain (Musa spp.) cultures

FATMA HUSSEIN KIRUWA 1*, EMMANUEL EPATHRA MLINGA 1, AGATHA AMNAAY ALOYCE , MPOKI MATHEW SHIMWELA

1TANZANIA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (TARI) Tengeru Sub Centre, 2TANZANIA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (TARI) Maruku Sub Centre, 3The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology (NM-AIST)

Received: 5 December 2023; Accepted: 24 January 2024

Abstract

Banana is a staple food and income crop for many people across the world. The study identified best practices for the initiation of banana (Musa spp.) cultures. Cultivars studied were East African Highland Bananas (Mchare, Nshakara), and Plantains, highly demanded by the farmers. The assessed factors included sterilization techniques for rainy and dry seasons, explants size, effects of Benzyl-Amino Purine (BAP) concentration on regeneration of cultures, effect of ascorbic acid on culture browning and culturing conditions. The finding revealed that ethanol alone (70%) or in combination with 1% sodium hypochlorite gives a higher (≥ 96%) percentage of aseptic culture establishment for both rainy and dry seasons. Size of explants was observed to affect the survival and regeneration of cultures as small (˂10mm) explants like meristem dome led to slower re-growth and high mortality which is not the case for large explants (≥ 10 mm). Moreover, MS media supplemented with BAP significantly enhanced the greening/shoot regeneration percentage at 14 days. However, there was no significant increase in number of greening/culture regeneration at concentrations of 5mg/l, 6mg/l and 8mg/l for Mzuzu, and 3mg/l, 5mg/l and 6mg/l for Nshakara. When explants were pre-treated with ascorbic acid at the rate of 100mg/l exposed for 10 min, browning decreased by 18%. It was also observed that growth conditions such as light were a greater determinant for regeneration of initiated banana cultures. Therefore, the study suggests the use of appropriate sterilization techniques, explants size, growth regulators, and conditions to insure sufficient production of planting materials.

Keywords: Browning, East African Highland Banana, Tissue culture, Culture contamination, Sterilization

JPB
Vol 51. 2024

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