On-line First

J Plant Biotechnol

Published online May 12, 2024

© The Korean Society of Plant Biotechnology

Phosphate depletion: research state and challenges in agriculture

Na-Hyun Shin 1, Lae-Hyeon Cho 1, 2*

1Life and Industry Convergence Research Institute, Pusan National University, Miryang 50463, Republic of Korea, 2Department of Plant Bioscience, College of Natural Resources and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang 50463, Republic of Korea

Received: 10 May 2024; Accepted: 12 May 2024

Abstract

Phosphate, an important macronutrient required for plant growth, is involved in various metabolic processes, including the composition of nucleic acids and phospholipids as well as energy metabolism. Phosphorus fertilizers are not reusable and phosphate rock, which is the only resource of phosphorus fertilizer, is limited and becoming depleted. To address this issue, phosphate transporters (encoded by genes associated with phosphate transport), which can absorb phosphate from underground soil and transport it to aerial parts of plants, have been identified in Arabidopsis and major crops, such as rice, wheat, barley, maize, and soybean. Phosphate in the soil is primarily absorbed through the diffusion of phosphate gradients between soil and plant and transported to the shoot via the xylem. The acquired phosphate is used by the plant and accumulates in the seeds. It influences plant growth for the next generation. Symbiotic phosphate acquisition via arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been examined and the genes/quantitative trait loci involved in increased phosphate uptake with enhanced yield have been reported. However, phosphate uptake is affected by various environmental factors in the soil, such as water content, pH, texture, temperature, and composition of elements, apart from climate. Thus, developing varieties containing the desired traits for high phosphate uptake and use-efficiency in each crop and cultivating them in appropriate environments is essential. This review provides comprehensive information on transporters and genes/quantitative trait loci that are known to enhance phosphate acquisition/transportation and we discuss measures to address the problem of phosphorus depletion.

Keywords Phosphorus, phosphate depletion, phosphate acquisition, phosphate use-efficiency, crop yield

Article

On-line First

J Plant Biotechnol

Published online May 12, 2024

Copyright © The Korean Society of Plant Biotechnology.

Phosphate depletion: research state and challenges in agriculture

Na-Hyun Shin 1, Lae-Hyeon Cho 1, 2*

1Life and Industry Convergence Research Institute, Pusan National University, Miryang 50463, Republic of Korea, 2Department of Plant Bioscience, College of Natural Resources and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang 50463, Republic of Korea

Received: 10 May 2024; Accepted: 12 May 2024

Abstract

Phosphate, an important macronutrient required for plant growth, is involved in various metabolic processes, including the composition of nucleic acids and phospholipids as well as energy metabolism. Phosphorus fertilizers are not reusable and phosphate rock, which is the only resource of phosphorus fertilizer, is limited and becoming depleted. To address this issue, phosphate transporters (encoded by genes associated with phosphate transport), which can absorb phosphate from underground soil and transport it to aerial parts of plants, have been identified in Arabidopsis and major crops, such as rice, wheat, barley, maize, and soybean. Phosphate in the soil is primarily absorbed through the diffusion of phosphate gradients between soil and plant and transported to the shoot via the xylem. The acquired phosphate is used by the plant and accumulates in the seeds. It influences plant growth for the next generation. Symbiotic phosphate acquisition via arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been examined and the genes/quantitative trait loci involved in increased phosphate uptake with enhanced yield have been reported. However, phosphate uptake is affected by various environmental factors in the soil, such as water content, pH, texture, temperature, and composition of elements, apart from climate. Thus, developing varieties containing the desired traits for high phosphate uptake and use-efficiency in each crop and cultivating them in appropriate environments is essential. This review provides comprehensive information on transporters and genes/quantitative trait loci that are known to enhance phosphate acquisition/transportation and we discuss measures to address the problem of phosphorus depletion.

Keywords: Phosphorus, phosphate depletion, phosphate acquisition, phosphate use-efficiency, crop yield

JPB
Vol 51. 2024

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Plant Biotechnology

pISSN 1229-2818
eISSN 2384-1397
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